Thursday, June 23, 2022

Quack Psychologist Todd Grande Misrepresents Redlick Case, Ridicules Classic Signs Of PTSD

Posted by Peter Quennell

Click here for viewer comments. Video summary of facts below.

Context

The misleading title of the video is “Wife Hurries to Find New Lover After Stabbing Husband”

That never happened.

We have encountered the money-making by victim-shaming quack psychologist Todd Grande before. He seriously misrepresented Amanda Knox.

Now he seriously misrepresents Danielle Redlick, mainly by playing the tragedy for giggles and omitting most of the hard facts.

Viewing of the brutal honesty of her testimony is a real eye-opener. Prior to her taking the stand just about all bets were against her, and she had been demonized for years.

These things among others came out at trial and strongly justified her verdict of “not guilty”.

    1. She was NOT on a dating site. The dating app showed up for a mere 10 seconds as the app provider testified.

    2. Evidence of abuse by him was extensive, like witnesses to his hitting her. She tried for divorce and he stopped it.

    3. They separated (hence the dating app) but he moved back in unilaterally and resumed roughing her up.

    4. He had been raging at her since the previous day after spotting the app. Their children texted her to take care.

    5. He attacked her violently, coming down on her, and the single defensive stab apparently seemed minor to both of them.

    6. He walked around and yelled at her locked in the bathroom for up to 20 minutes. When she finally felt it safe to emerge he was dead. 

    7. Her muddled actions for the rest of the night are already declared by more-professional psychologists to be strong symptoms of PTSD - which she may need to keep fighting for years.

Todd Grande’s YouTube is the one irresponsible outlier. The first of the other YouTube analyses and the viewer comments below them - again mostly by women - are all totally on the mark.

Below: a factually correct 13-minute overview

Posted by Peter Quennell on 06/23/22 at 11:14 AM in

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Comments

A factoid on “The dating app showed up for a mere 10 seconds as the app provider testified”.

It was the opening page on her phone browser, not because she had been using it, but because he had seized her phone and was looking at it.

Posted by Peter Quennell on 06/23/22 at 12:24 PM | #

The Redlick house is blurred out on Google Earth, rather odd as there are so many images of it online.

Search these coordinates and drop down to Street View if you are interested in the “million dollar neighborhood” of this sad tale. 

28°36’35.74"N 81°20’12.36"W

And Danielle Redlick was not exactly an “unemployed barmaid” as some incels on social media have declared, she was very well qualified as her biography here shows.

https://tinyurl.com/y57xp2fn

Posted by Peter Quennell on 06/23/22 at 04:31 PM | #

There is online evidence that Todd Grande of Wilmington Delaware really IS a quack doing potentially damaging remote analysis he is not qualified for.

1. See this critical take by a qualified psychiatrist. https://tinyurl.com/37663dm9 In the Comments some like him but many are not so sure.

You are absolutely right! He IS victim shaming. This is the main reason I lost respect towards him at first and then started to see more disturbing things peeking through the cracks. I think he’s highly intelligent and maybe he’s even good at whatever he calls this thing he’s doing - but there’s something about him. I can’t exactly put my finger on it, but it makes him look less genuine than the persona he’s trying to paint himself. Let’s just say I wouldn’t be surprised if I saw him on the news one day.

I fully agree, he is often extremely biased, while pretending to be objective, and to anyone with a deeper understanding of the subjects of his videos it is obvious he is just winging it. Avoid him,  if you’re actually interested in knowing more about these subjects.

He clearly has little insight as far as psychology. And who jokes about murderers and victims?

I am so glad you posted this. I have a BPD and some of his one sided negative views can be very upsetting. I feel it is a misinterpretation of people with this illness to serve a specific judgement which can be damaging.

I’m so glad you are putting this out there.  When I first started watching him, I was favorably impressed. No doubt, some of his comments were right on.  But then his abundance of snarky comments and his overall supercilious presentation began to wear on me.  I began to wonder if this gig of his was just a way to covertly

2. Last October a suspicious professional checked him out, and came up with this report.

https://tinyurl.com/3pmc4ubr

Something I can’t stand these days is people misusing their credentials for personal gains. I am a Pharmacist and I never heard of a medical practitioner giving their opinions on people they never consulted or met in person.

I don’t think psychology should be exempt from this.. So I went on to investigate Dr. Todd and here’s what I found.

Obviously Dr Todd is only licensed as a Mental Health Counselor. They do not have the same level of knowledge as a licensed psychiatrist. They do have knowledge on mental disorders but I do not think it’s their specialty area and they do not have the authority to prescribe a pharmacological treatment.

I think It’s even damaging to discuss people in this way.  honestly lost respect for him openly requesting people to support him on Patreon:

https://www.patreon.com/drgrande

“Even psychiatrists don’t comment on the mental health of anyone they haven’t examined,” explains John Torous, a psychiatrist at a teaching hospital affiliated with Harvard Medical School.

This is the so-called Goldwater rule. The American Psychiatric Association created this rule — which prohibits members from publicly commenting on the mental health of someone they haven’t examined.

“The armchair psychologist who ticked off YouTube”

https://tinyurl.com/5au5kvvn

YouTube channel The Rewired Soul is meant to educate on important topics in psychology, but critics say it’s a gossip channel in the guise of mental health advocacy. Quoting from Quora

“Dr. Grande is not a Licensed Psychologist, not a Licensed Psychiatrist, and not a Licensed Medical doctor. Dr. Grande received his Ph.D. in Philosophy, and not in medicine. Dr. Grande is licensed by the state of Delaware as a Mental Health Counselor. Licensed Mental Health Counselors do not have the same scope of practice as a Licensed Psychologist, a Licensed Psychiatrist, or a Licensed Medical doctor. Licensed Mental Health Counselors have their own Licensing Regulation Board which is separate from the Licensed Psychology Board.”

“Dr. Grande posts sensationalized videos on his YouTube channel that often gives diagnosis to people which is acting outside his scope of practice, in my opinion. In April of 2019, a Journalist wrote a news article entitled something like, “Armchair Psychologists Who Ticked Off YouTube,” where Dr. Grande is mentioned as being one of the armchair psychologists that gossips. The news story pointed out that, “Even Psychiatrists don’t comment on the mental health of anyone they haven’t examined.”

“If you feel that you would like to file a complaint against Dr. Grande, then you can file your complaint with the Delaware Licensing Board for Mental Health and Chemical Dependency, or you might try filing a complaint with the Delaware Licensing Board for Psychology because the Delaware Psychology Board has a checkbox for people that are operating without a License in Psychology.”

Posted by Peter Quennell on 06/23/22 at 09:32 PM | #

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